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  • Rowls Mini
    replied
    Haynes shows flat bar for their Tool Tip. I figured angle iron would be less likely to bend sideways.

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  • Jerry
    replied
    Thanks for the tip on the ABS pipe but cannot figure out use of angle iron for the tool. I had to use flat bar.

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  • Rowls Mini
    replied
    I replaced the drive flanges, swivel hubs, bearings and on the worn shaft the CV joint/shaft. brake run-out is 0.15 and 0.17 mm but the brake shimmy is gone (for now). By the way, I used the Haynes tool tip to hold the hubs stationary while breaking the nuts loose and also overtorquing them to allow installation of the split pin. I made the tool out of 1 1/4", 1/8" thick angle iron and saw no deflection. I also found that 2" schedule 40 ABS pipe is the perfect size for installing bearings and seals.

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  • mascher
    replied
    0.005" of wear seems pretty bad. I don't think I ever seen one that bad. It sounds like the bearing may have locked up spun on the stub shaft. Also possible someone installed a lower quality CV. Did the outer race of the wheel bearing in the swivel hub fit well?


    Kelley

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  • Rowls Mini
    replied
    yes, the wear is on the sub shaft

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  • mascher
    replied
    I may have misinterpreted what you mean. Is the wear on the stub shaft of the CV joint that passes through the bearings? This is the shaft between the articulating part of the CV and the drive flange.


    Kelley

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  • Rowls Mini
    replied
    just to clarify definitions. As i understand the terms the drive shaft runs from the transmission to the CV joint. The CV joint and shaft run to the driving hub. It is on this portion of the shaft that there is scouring, apparently from the outside wheel bearing. The normal shaft diameter is about 1.250 inches, at the worst of the scouring it's about 1.245 inches.

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  • mascher
    replied
    In my experience the CV can touch the driveshaft and leave a mark around it. Unless it's fairly deep I wouldn't worry about it. If your fingernail can just catch the edge it's only about 0.001" and isn't a problem. On the other hand if it's depth is the same as the thickness of a dime even I would consider replacing the drive shaft. Measuring the diameter to determine the depth might be helpful. The only driveshaft failure I have ever see involved failure of the splines that go into the CV.


    Kelley

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  • Rowls Mini
    replied
    Addendum - Rather than the drive shaft, I should have been called the CV Joint.

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  • Rowls Mini
    replied
    I've ordered new drive hubs, swivel hubs, bearings and ball joints. However after cleaning up the drive shafts I see that the left outside bearing has apparently slightly "machined" the shaft. Is there some tolerance for this, a fix or is a new shaft required?
    Thanks.

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  • Rowls Mini
    replied
    I had the rotors machined and the right rotor run-out is now in spec. However the left one still isn't. I rotated the rotor 180 degrees on the hub flange and got the same results. I did a run-out check on the hub flange itself and got a 0.011" variation so it appears the hub flange is the problem, not the rotor. Is it a matter of new bearings and hub flange or could it be something else? Thanks.

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  • Rowls Mini
    replied
    Back at it. Before I go any further i just want to confirm that the drive shaft can be loose and able to move in and out in the swivel hub after the driving flange is removed. It is loose on the left wheel but wasn't when I removed the right flange.

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  • mascher
    replied
    I've seen this a few times and usually the first sign is loose or loosening wheel bearings, the driveshaft retaining nut becomes loose. The drive flanges will need to be replaced if the groove is very deep. If you can just barely feel the groove or if a fingernail can just grab the groove edge it should be ok. The bad ones I've seen have been pretty deep, less than the thickness of a dime but not by much.



    Buy the better drive flanges, EN24T steel, if I recall correctly. You will also need to inspect and possibly change the wheel bearings and inspect the hub they mount in.


    Kelley

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  • Rowls Mini
    replied
    Minispares says the wheel bearing can spin and wear a very machined groove in the drive flange. My flange definitely has machined grooves in the flange. Time for new flanges? and what else?

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  • Rowls Mini
    replied
    Took hubs apart again, no burrs seen. ran bit in hole countersinks, ground surfaces with flat stone and cleaned with Dremel wire wheel. After reassembly right hub now 0.008", better than 0.010" but still out of spec. Left hub worse, now 0.018". I took the hub/rotor off again and reinstalled it on a different rotation on the drive shaft, exactly the same result. For some reason the right drive shaft stayed fixed when I removed the hub. The left one was loose and could be slid in and out. I don't think this is significant but just wanted to note it. Something else to try?

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